Kirstin

Kirstin

Cleveland, OH

A devastating car accident forced Kristie to confront her addiction to alcohol. She now works to maintain her newfound sobriety.

I started drinking when I was like 15. The reason I started drinking—I don’t really know the reason. I mean, probably because my dad was always happy, my aunts and my uncles and stuff. when they would drink. And I wanted to be just like that. That’s how I started to drink. And then I noticed that I was depressed a lot. Like I was fun and outgoing, but there were times where I would withdraw, like go into the woods and sit by myself, or sit in a closet and do Lite Brite. Like I was extroverted introvert, whatever you want to call it. And then that from there, drinking was incorporated into every aspect of my life. And as I got older, it just got worse and worse. And I lost friends, I lost family, I’ve been in and out of jail. I flipped my car, almost died. Lost my kid.

I woke up arguing with God about my kids. Like I need to make my life right. That’s what I was screaming about when I was in the trauma center. And then I woke up and I was in the hospital for like nine days, all by myself. Nobody—one person came, that was it. Nobody even knew who I was. I couldn’t tell them. I was out of it. I’ve been in and out of bad relationships, been a victim of violent crimes, discovered a newer drug as I got older, was tampering with that.

Right now, I finally surrendered after all these years. I’ve been in an out of treatments. After I flipped my car, I went out with a cast on my leg, a cast on my arm, and three broken ribs, two week later, and went and bought me another car. And I was still drinking. And then I ended up drinking and driving in that vehicle. And that’s what actually brought me to my knees. I was just like, “What the hell am I doing?” I didn’t have anybody to take care of me. Everybody basically gave up on me. So I was all by myself trying to get through. And that’s when I called Stella’s detox. And I’ve been here ever since. And now I’m living in a sober house.

Sobriety is achievable if you have the willingness and—you know, you surrender yourself and believe in something greater than yourself. And stick to it and follow through, and just do the next right thing.

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